Calling young artists to Many Cultures Day!

Calling young artists to Many Cultures Day!

Calling young artists to Many Cultures Day!

Folkmoot is looking for young artists and entrepreneurs, age 17 or younger, who want to share handmade art or crafts during Folkmoot 2018’s Many Cultures Day, Saturday, July 21.

Many Cultures Day will be a fun-filled festival-within-the-festival on the first weekend of Folkmoot 2018 and is designed with activities for youth and families.

Young artist-entrepreneurs can register for a vendor space by filling out an online application here and paying a $5 application fee.

Folkmoot 2018 opens July 19 and runs through July 29 and will feature performing dance troupes from Ghana, Italy, Czech Republic, Mexico, Thailland and Northern Cyprus and Venezuela as well as Anglo Appalachian and, as always, Cherokee dancers and musicians. 

Ticket packages and tickets for individual performances are available here.

Calling young artists to Many Cultures Day!Many Cultures Day is held immediately after the Parade of Nations down Main Street, Waynesville and features live entertainment by youthful singers and dancers, folk dance lessons by international performers, an arts and crafts tent, food and beverage trucks and activities lead by local nonprofit organizations.

This is the third year of Many Cultures Day and attendance is projected at 3,000 to 5,000 guests.

Young entrepreneurs must successfully submit their application by Friday, June 15, 2018 to be considered.

A shared tent will be provided but entrepreneurs must bring their own signage, table, chairs and table covering. Vendor guidelines and applications can be found here

Please no food or beverage products. Applications must be submitted with three (3) color images of items the applicant intends to sell.

Please contact Laura Shepherd or Catherine MacCallum at 828-452-2997 for more information.

Folkmoot, a word meaning “meeting of the people,” provides communities all over Western North Carolina the opportunity to build a deeper sense of connection, mutual respect and shared purpose by experiencing other cultures.  

In 1973, Dr. Clinton Border, a Waynesville surgeon, accompanied a local square dance team to a folk festival in Sidmouth, England. There began the dream that would, 11 years later, become Folkmoot USA.

Border was convinced that Western North Carolina, which was already steeped in tradition and dedicated to the preservation of its own heritage, was the perfect location for an international folk festival in the United States. During the next few years, Border traveled to other festivals in Poland and France and began gathering information and developing contacts. He also started contacting local government and community leaders back home.

By 1983, Border was ready to present his vision to Haywood County’s community leaders. Despite language barriers and the inherent scheduling difficulties involved in getting foreign performers from their homes to Haywood County, Border believed something invaluable occurs when cultures so rich in tradition come together to share their lives.

One month after Border’s presentation to community leaders, a board of directors met to launch Folkmoot USA, the North Carolina International Folk Festival.