Shady Ladies cover Frog Level with quilts

Shady Ladies cover Frog Level with quilts

Shady Ladies cover Frog Level with quilts when they gather June 8-10 at the Folkmoot Friendship Center for their 16th annual quilt show.

The featured exhibit of the 2018 quilt show will be the group’s finely crafted quilts depicting favorite images of Waynesville’s Frog Level district, the Richland Creek historic and industrial area emerging as a major artistic and creative center.

“Named for the frogs that emerged after Richland Creek flooding, this area of Waynesville is rich with history and architectural interest,” explained Jane Cole, one of the Shady Ladies quilting group leaders. “Waynesville would not have developed as it did without the railroad, which arrived in Frog Level in 1884.  We felt that the Frog Level buildings are worthy of a tribute in fabric and challenged these talented quilters to represent them on 12 inch quilt blocks.”

Shady Ladies cover Frog Level with quiltsAfter the arrival of the railroad, tourist hotels and boarding houses were built around Main Street.  Frog Level was the center of commerce and industry, with buildings for wholesale grocers, coal delivery, feed and seed warehouses, mills and automobile dealers.

“Frog Level Facades,” the quilt show’s focused exhibit, will include approximately 25 quilts depicting different views of numerous buildings along Water, Depot and Commerce Streets.

The small quilts range from realistic representations to artistic interpretations of buildings such as the Mia Salon & Spa, a Queen Anne dwelling built around 1900; the Frog Level Studio, a one-story building constructed around 1920 as a store with dwelling on the back; the warehouse that is now Panacea Coffeehouse, begun in 1913;  the building housing the Open Door Ministries, built around 1920; and the frame building on Commerce St. built about 1915 as a Ford dealership.

In addition to the Frog Level squares, the Shady Ladies will exhibit 100 of their recently made quilts, ranging from artistic wall hangings to traditional bed quilts.

“The show is really a benefit for the community,” said Wendy Bowen, Shady Lady leader. “All the $5 entry fees will go to Folkmoot and proceeds from our raffle quilt will be divided between Meals on Wheels and the Pigeon St. Community Center.”

The quilt show will be open Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m.

For more information about the Shady Ladies visit the group’s Facebook page by clicking here.

Find out more about the historic Frog Level district by clicking here.

Folkmoot 2018 opens July 19 and runs through July 29 and will feature performing dance troupes from Ghana, Italy, Czech Republic, Mexico, Thailland and Northern Cyprus and Venezuela as well as Anglo Appalachian and, as always, Cherokee dancers and musicians. 

Ticket packages and tickets for individual performances are available here.

Quilt Art by the Shady Ladies

June 2-4, 2017 the Folkmoot Friendship Center will host the annual exhibition Quilt Art by the Shady Ladies. The show is open from 10a.m. until 5p.m. on Friday and Saturday, and from noon until  4p.m. on Sunday. There is a $5.00 entry fee.

This year the members of the Shady Ladies Quilting Group have been challenged to represent Haywood County architecture in original art quilts. “The subjects the artists selected vary from new public buildings to interesting signs to even include structures that are now only memories,” explained Jane Cole, one of the leaders of the group.  “If you enjoyed our Barn Challenge quilts last year, Haywood’s MANMADE Angles has a broader focus and will not disappoint.”

There is much history to be found in the quilts. For example, Shady Lady, Chris Kroot, chose ‘The Owl’ as inspiration for her quilt. This building is located along the railroad tracks on the Old Asheville Highway in Haywood County and was built during the Great Depression by Earnest Skaggs. He was a master craftsman and constructed the building by hand with nothing more than a pick-up truck and a wheelbarrow.

“It took Skaggs 15 years to complete the building, which was in operation until 1970 as a drive-in restaurant and produce stand,” Chris Kroot elaborated. “The diner was popular after WWII with tourists visiting the National Park, train travelers going to Asheville, and local families. Why was it called ‘The Owl’? Evidently there was an old aspen tree on the other side of the road where a screech owl would sit almost every day. One day it landed on the building so Skaggs decided to call it ‘The Owl’.”

In addition to the historic architectural pieces, the Shady Ladies will exhibit 100 of their recently made quilts. Their designs range from artistic wall hangings to traditional bed quilts. The show also includes a boutique stocked with small quilts and quilting-related items.

“The show is really a benefit for the community,” said Wendy Bowen, Shady Lady leader. “All proceeds from our raffle quilt will be divided among Haywood County Hospice, Pigeon St. Community Center, and Meals on Wheels.”

For information about Shady Ladies, visit our Facebook page: Shady Lady Quilting Group.

 

Quilt Art by the Shady Ladies – Exhibition

Quilt Art by the Shady Ladies

Enjoy the region’s finest quilt art in the annual exhibition, Quilt Art by the Shady Ladies. The Shady Ladies, a quilt group in Haywood County, will host June 3-5 its 13th annual quilt show this year at the Folkmoot Friendship Center located in the Historic Hazelwood School. The newly renovated gymnasium will be filled with … Read more